EyeRounds Online Atlas of Ophthalmology

Contributor: Jordan M. Graff, MD and Chet B. Patel, MD, University of Iowa

Category: Retina

Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR)

Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR)

CSR (sometimes called Central Serous Chorioretinopathy or CSCR) is seen most commonly in male & female patients between the ages of 20 and 40 years of age.
In Figure 1, a large, elevated area of serous retinal detachment can be seen occupying much of the temporal macula.
Within the central area of this detachment, there appears to be a second, smaller, ring of elevation. Flourescein angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed that this smaller elevated ring is a pigment epithelial detachment (PED) within the larger area of serous retinal detachment (see Figures 2-4 and discussion below).

Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR)

Early views of the flourescein angiogram demonstrate a hot spot of hyperflourescence that spreads to fill the PED. (In other classic cases of CSR, the hot spot may appear as a "smoke stack").

Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR)

Late views with flourescein reveal the pooling of fluid within the serous detachement, correlating with the clinical appearance of the fundus in Figure 1.

Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR)

OCT images demonstrate a discrete blister of fluid underneath the RPE just temporal to the foveal depression. This defines the PED. The overlying serous retinal detachement is also evident.




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