University of Iowa Health Care

Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

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Congenital aniridia

Contributor: Jesse Vislisel, MD

Photographers: Brice Critser, CRA, Cindy Montague, CRA

Congenital aniridia is a hereditary disease most commonly with autosomal dominant inheritance.  These slit lamp photographs of a 17-year-old with aniridia show corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia.  There is fluorescein uptake of the pannus due to leaky intracellular junctions.  The patient also has small anterior polar cataracts.  The macular OCT shows absence of the normal foveal depression, consistent with foveal hypoplasia.  Please see the related case report for more information about this patient and congenital aniridia.

corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia
corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia
corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia
fluorescein uptake of the pannus  due to leaky intracellular junctions fluorescein uptake of the pannus  due to leaky intracellular junctions
small anterior polar cataracts small anterior polar cataracts

Figure 1:  Slit lamp photographs (A, B, C, D, E, F) show corneal pannus, subepithelial haze, and iris hypoplasia.  There is fluorescein uptake of the pannus (G, H) due to leaky intracellular junctions.  The patient had small anterior polar cataracts (I, J).

Macular OCT revealed an absence of the normal foveal depression, consistent with foveal hypoplasia

Figure 2:  Macular OCT revealed an absence of the normal foveal depression, consistent with foveal hypoplasia.


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last updated: 05/11/2015
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