University of Iowa Health Care

Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

EyeRounds.org

Cornea verticillata

Contributor: Jesse Vislisel, MD

Cornea verticillata, also known as vortex keratopathy, describes a pattern of whorl- shaped opacities within the basal corneal epithelium. They are most commonly located in the inferior paracentral region, are non-elevated, and can range from white to brown in color. These changes are usually not visually significant. Cornea verticillata is often caused by the use of certain systemic medications, the most common of which include amiodarone, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, indomethacin, and phenothiazenes. Cornea verticillata can also be seen in the sphingolipidosis, Fabry disease.

Read the related case report for more information on cornea verticillata


Figure 1

Cornea verticillata in a patient with long-term amiodarone use and presumed amiodarone optic neuropathy

Contributor: Jesse Vislisel, MD

Photographer: Brice Critser, CRA

right eye. a pattern of whorl- shaped opacities within the basal corneal epithelium
left eye. a pattern of whorl- shaped opacities within the basal corneal epithelium
right eye left eye

Figure 2

Cornea verticillata in a patient taking amiodarone

Contributor: Jesse Vislisel, MD; W.L.M. Alward, MD

Photographer: Brice Critser, CRA

Cornea verticillata in a another patient taking amiodarone
right eye left eye
right eye left eye

Figure 3

Cornea verticillata in a young female which led to the diagnosis of Fabry disease

Contributor: Jesse Vislisel, MD

Photographer: Cindy Montague, CRA

Cornea verticillata in a young female which led to the diagnosis of Fabry disease.


Figure 4

Cornea verticillata in a patient with known Fabry disease.

Contributor: Jeff Welder, MD

right eye:

Fabry Disease, right eye

left eye:

Cornea verticillata in a patient with known Fabry disease, left eye

 

last updated: 01/24/2016
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